Candyman, Killer Clown, & More Urban Legends Make For Chiller Special

Chiller debuts Killer Legends on 16 March at 8PM Eastern. This primetime special has filmmakers Rachel Mills and Joshua Zeman examining four tales from the scary side of American mythology. Below is from the press release detailing the four featured urban legends: Candyman, Baby-Sitter & the Man Upstairs, Hookman, and the Killer Clown from Chicago.

The Candyman: The film takes viewers to Houston, Texas, to explore the legend of tainted candy that strikes fear in parents every Halloween. Though the legend is prolific, in actuality there is only one documented case of a child dying from tainted candy: 8-year-old Timothy O’Bryan. Timothy was poisoned on Halloween by a real-life miscreant who used the legend to hide his crime, earning him the nickname, The Candyman.

(Read about the Houston Mass Murders. – Ed.)

The Baby-Sitter and the Man Upstairs: As the legend goes, a babysitter tormented by a twisted caller, learns that the sadistic calls are coming from inside the house. While the babysitter has become the go-to victim in so many of our horror films, does the same hold true in real life? Tragically, the answer is yes…as our filmmakers discover in the unsolved case of Janett Christman, a babysitter who was slain in Columbia, MO, in 1950.

(Read about the original urban legend. – Ed.)

The Hookman: The filmmakers investigate the “Moonlight Murders” of Texarkana that some believe sparked “The Hook” urban legend of the 1950’s and 60’s. Based upon the legend of two teens lovers terrorized by a madman with a hook for a hand, we will investigate this real life case of a killer known as The Phantom, who in 1946 attacked five couples parked on lovers’ lanes. This unsolved crime has created its own unique urban legend in Texarkana, perpetuated by a town that refuses to forget.

(Read about the Texarkana Moonlight Murders. – Ed.)

The Killer Clown: In Chicago, the filmmakers investigate the “phantom clown” scares that have been spontaneously occurring since the 1980s. In cities across the globe, clowns have been spotted in vans trying to snatch children. Is this just a case of hysteria, manifested by fears of coulrophobia (the fear of clowns), or is there something much more serious at work? As we explore Chicago’s creepy clown past, from John Wayne Gacy to Bozo, we attempt to answer the question of how clowns became so evil, and why they continue to haunt our nightmares.

(Read about Chicago’s “Homey the Clown” scare. – Ed.)

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Author: Clarence

Webmaster, editor, writer of Red-Headed Mule. RHM was founded in 2011. Currently is liking British TV better than U.S. TV, mayhaps.