ANNIVERSARY! Super Mario Super Show Debuts in 1989!

For me, Nintendo-mania reached a fever pitch by 1989. September 4, 1989 is the premiere of the Super Mario Bros. Super Show starring Lou Albano and Danny Wells and the power plumbing brothers. Kids were astounded(?) with the cheesy variety-show-quality live action comedy mixed with the cheesy animation based on elements of Super Mario 1 & 2 Monday through Thursday. On Fridays, we all giggled at Link’s attempts to woo Zelda in the Legend of Zelda cartoon which replaced the Super Mario cartoon that day. Communism would fall and all was good.

As a six-year-old kid without a sense of good taste in entertainment, I was in awe of special guests to Mario & Luigi’s home(?) like Magic Johnson, Roddy Piper, Ernie Hudson, Inspector Gadget, and Captain Lou Albano. Six years old is probably the maximum age where someone could tolerate live action segments with the craft of a Brady Bunch variety show. That said, six-year-old me liked seeing Mario every weekday finishing each show with a dance (Do the Mario!) so I was entertained. Seven-year-old wasn’t pleased at the totally radical Club Mario nonsense that took away Capt. Albano and Mr. Wells a year later.

The cartoon segments were fine back then. The Super Mario animated stuff would sometimes rip off a movie or genre like Indiana Jones or James Bond. I recall it was odd that the fire flower was used a lot, but super mushrooms never came into play. The Mario cartoons would get slightly more ambitious with the later Super Mario Bros. 3 cartoon, but limped along with the meme-tastic Super Mario World.

The Super Mario Super Show is up on YouTube and Netflix USA as I type this. Now swing your arms from side to side in Albano and Wells’ honor.

Bon! or Bonkers: Nintendo on Wii U Gameplay Streaming

reggie-mii-fighter-topper

Nintendo of America chief Reggie “FEES AH-MAY,” responding to Brian Crecente’s question about Twitch support on Wii U, says that Nintendo “[doesn’t] think streaming 30 minutes of gameplay by itself.” On the other hand, Fils-Aime asserts the success Nintendo has with Twitch with events such as Nintendo Treehouse Live and the Super Smash Bros. Invitational.

It’s well known that Nintendo has a spotty record of supporting whatever hot new trends competitors follow. However, Fils-Aime elaborates on why Nintendo feels that way and discusses alternatives. Do you think Fils-Aime’s comments are genuine (Bon!) or generally bizaree (Bonkers).

Read the full article by Polygon’s Brian Crecente for Reggie’s comments and rationale.

Bon! Reggie is Right!

* Watching people merely play games for 30 minutes is actually boring.
* Nintendo, family-friendly company they are, may appear to give consent to undesirable content.
* Nintendo prefers exciting highlights culled from matches (e.g. Mario Kart TV).
* Possible technical considerations not discussed which would drain computer power from the Wii U.

Bonkers! WTF, Nintendo

* Twitch is a very popular, so Nintendo is missing out on giving full support.
* Gamers have found creative uses for streams (e.g. chat interactions, voiceovers).
* Nintendo are simply control freaks waiting for the opportunity to get their cut.

How do I feel? From my limited perspective as a non-Wii U owner, lacking a Twitch channel/app won’t be as big of a deal like the GameCube’s lack of DVD playback or Wii outputting standard-definition video only. What do you think?

Ken Griffey Jr.'s Winning Run: Baseball's Best on SNES

Ken Griffey Jr.'s Winning Run Box Art

1996. Many baseball fans are back to loving the National Pastime after the 1994 strike. My beloved Braves finally give the city of Atlanta its first major sports championship in 1995 after beating the once-woeful Cleveland Indians. The Yankees are back into prominence. Nintendo must have been pleased at the Seattle Mariners’ advancing to the League Championship Series. Mariners advance when Griffey scores the winning run…BOOM! Nintendo’s going to cash in! Continue reading “Ken Griffey Jr.’s Winning Run: Baseball’s Best on SNES”