Home > Comics

Dredd-less Justice, Simon Bisley Returns, & Darwin in 2000 AD Prog 1848

Posted on 10:29 pm, 4th September 2013 by | Email the author

2000-ad-1848-slaine-bisley-topper

Where was I?

It’s been a while since I’ve covered the weekly anthology of Thrills. (My sincerest apologies to Tharg the Mighty)

I’ll have to jump onto the strips mid-story, so I’ll share my experiences reading most of them. Will these strips be worth checking back issues? Let’s begin this review.

2000-ad-1848-cover 2000-ad-1848-judge-dredd-bender-sample-web

With “Judge Dredd: Bender,” I’m impressed that I could get the gist of the story and its two main characters, the titular Judge and Judge Lock. Writer John Wagner scripts an episode that recognizes the fine line between vengeance and justice.

“Judge Dredd: Bender” is drawn by Ben Willsher and coloured by Chris Blythe.

simon-bisley-slaine-horned-god-2013-web“Sláine: The Book of Scars, Part Five” features Sláine confronting the Lord Weird Slough Feg as visualized splendidly by Simon Bisley. This chapter of “Scars” revisits the famed “The Horned God,” but I don’t think there was anything in the original story about convincing a storyteller to spare Sláine from dying in an animalistic nightmare.

Would you feel you’ve wasted two-quid-thirty-five after discovering the meta-commentary?

Writer/co-creator Pat Mills seems to have peppered commentary about the commercialization and marketing of telling tales. “Scars, Part Five” is a great visual introduction to the tales of the great Celtic warrior. Bisley has rightly earned acclaim for his work on the original “Horned God” story; this is what I imagine how classical Celtic adventures were illustrated.

On the other hand, if you, like me, are new to Celic and pagan myths, you’d look up information to figure out the “hows” and “whys” of the Lord Weird/Sláine conflict. The Pat Mills stories I’ve read in the year-plus I’ve covered 2000AD aren’t quick reads or “popcorn” entertainment.

*Ahem*

Going from one legend to another, “Past Imperfect: Origins” is a groanworthy tale basically stating that Charles Darwin’s discoveries about the theory of evolution began off the coast of Africa. Don’t miss the tacked-on literary allusion in the end. Or do. Some of the crew accompanying Darwin are deserving of their own awards, if you will.

“Origins” written by T.C. Eglington and drawn by John Charles.

Not Reviewed

“Age of the Werewolf III: Wolfworld” by Alec Worley, Jon Davis-Hunt, and Gary Caldwell.

“The Ten-Seconders: Godsend” by Rob Williams, Ben Willsher, and Abigail Ryder. Oh-Emm-Gee, a Jack Kirby homage!

Prog 1848 is available now as DRM-free files at 2000ADOnline.com!

Enjoy our article? Share it:

Comments Are Closed!

Send further feedback to: the Webmaster